Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John:
Hi everyone, and welcome back to SwahiliPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 10 - Making Hiring Decisions in Kenya. John Here.
Medina:
Hamjambo, I'm Medina.
John:
In this lesson, you’ll learn about expressing uncertainty. The conversation takes place at an office.
Medina:
It's between Victor and Mable.
John:
The speakers are an employer and an employee, therefore, they will speak both formal and informal Swahili. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Victor:
Tunatafuta mtu wa kurithi cheo cha umeneja wa Tom.
Mable:
Je, Tom anawacha kazi?
Victor:
Sivyo, anapandishwa cheo kuwa mkurugenzi katika kampuni yetu nchini Kanada.
Mable:
Heri kwake. Je, unadhania Damon anaweza jaza pengo hilo?
Victor:
Mbona unawaza hivyo?
Mable:
Anaushurikiano bora na kila mtu. Yeye ni mjuzi na anajulikana kwa uongozi bora.
Victor:
Nilidhania hivyo pia. Nadhani anaujuzi wa kutosha inayohitajika katika cheo hicho.
Mable:
Divyo. Amekuwa meneja wa ofisi ya uuzaji kwa miaka sita sasa.
Victor:
Nitaongea nayeye kabla ya kutangaza.
Mable:
Ninauhakika tutapenda kufanya kazi kwa uongozi wake
John:
Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Victor:
We are currently looking for someone to succeed Tom in the managerial position.
Mable:
Is Tom leaving?
Victor:
Not really, he's been promoted to be the director of our company in Canada.
Mable:
Good for him. Don't you think Damon could fill in the gap?
Victor:
Why do you think so?
Mable:
He's friendly to everyone. He is skilled and a good leader.
Victor:
I thought the same. I suppose he's experienced for that position, too.
Mable:
Right, he's been managing the sales department for 6 years now.
Victor:
I will talk with him before making it public.
Mable:
I'm sure we will love to work under his leadership.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John:
Good luck to Tom at the company in Canada!
Medina:
Yes, sounds like a good promotion!
John:
It’s interesting to hear Victor and Mable discuss Tom’s successor.
Medina:
He certainly sounds qualified for the job.
John:
Is that how a promotion in Kenya works? That the best person for the job gets it, and not just the most senior person?
Medina:
Yes, it’s usually based on performance or qualifications.
John:
Even if that means a younger member of the staff is a better fit than an older one?
Medina:
Yes. Younger staff members that are in a position to be promoted have probably won awards or show competence in their job, so it isn’t questioned.
John:
It sounds like a very fair system.
Medina:
It’s not always so fair, though. Sometimes it’s luck, or sometimes bosses choose who they like.
John:
But whoever gets the job, then has to prove that they are worthy of it.
Medina:
Yes, there are many expectations and additional roles you have to do.
John:
Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John:
Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Medina:
rithi [natural native speed]
John:
to succeed
Medina:
rithi[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
rithi [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have..
Medina:
wacha [natural native speed]
John:
to let
Medina:
wacha[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
wacha [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have..
Medina:
pandishwa [natural native speed]
John:
to be promoted
Medina:
pandishwa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
pandishwa [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have..
Medina:
mkurugenzi [natural native speed]
John:
director
Medina:
mkurugenzi[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
mkurugenzi [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have..
Medina:
pengo [natural native speed]
John:
gap
Medina:
pengo[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
pengo [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have..
Medina:
ushirikiano [natural native speed]
John:
cooperation
Medina:
ushirikiano[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
ushirikiano [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have..
Medina:
ujuzi [natural native speed]
John:
experience
Medina:
ujuzi[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
ujuzi [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have..
Medina:
uuzaji [natural native speed]
John:
sales
Medina:
uuzaji[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
uuzaji [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have..
Medina:
tangaza [natural native speed]
John:
to tell, to spread
Medina:
tangaza[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
tangaza [natural native speed]
John:
And last..
Medina:
hakika [natural native speed]
John:
Sure.
Medina:
hakika[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
hakika [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John:
Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Medina:
kutafuta
John:
meaning "to look for"
John:
This word is made of two parts.
Medina:
The first is the indefinite pronoun ku. The second is tafuta.
John:
This is a root verb that means “look for.”
Medina:
You can use tafuta when there is a search.
John:
Can you give us an example using this word?
Medina:
Sure. For example, you can say.. Tumeanza kutafuta karo ya shule.
John:
..which means "We have started looking for school fees."
John:
Okay, what's the next phrase?
Medina:
rithi cheo
John:
meaning "to succeed a post"
John:
There are two words here, so can you tell us what they both mean?
Medina:
The first word rithi means to "succeed" or "inherit.” The second word is cheo.
John:
This is a “post” or “rank.”
Medina:
Altogether, it means “to succeed a post.”
John:
Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Medina:
Sure. For example, you can say.. Ametajirika kwa kurithi cheo cha babake
John:
.. which means “He has become rich after inheriting his father's post.”
John:
Okay, what's the next phrase?
Medina:
ofisi ya uuzaji
John:
meaning "sales department"
John:
That first word sounds a little like the English word “office.”
Medina:
Well spotted. Ofisi is borrowed from English. Ya is a preposition meaning "of," and the final word is uuzaji.
John:
This means “sales.” Put together, the phrase literally means “office of sales.”
Medina:
It sounds better as “sales department.”
John:
Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Medina:
Sure. For example, you can say.. Ofisi ya uuzaji umepata faida ya juu zaidi.
John:
.. which means "The sales department has gotten the highest profit."
John:
Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John:
In this lesson, you'll learn about expressing uncertainty. First, let’s look at how indefinite pronouns work in Swahili.
Medina:
An example of a Swahili indefinite pronoun is kila.
John:
This means “each, every.” So indefinite pronouns are words that aren’t specific in number. Another example is “several”.
Medina:
That is kadhaa. Although these refer to multiple objects, they take a singular form, not a plural one.
John:
So they have to agree with singular noun classes. Let’s hear a sentence example.
Medina:
Kila nyumba ina amri zake.
John:
“Every house has it’s own rules.”
Medina:
Mtu fulani alikuja hapa.
John:
“Someone came here.” Next, let’s look at some key phrases that will help us express opinions.
Medina:
If you want to show what you’re thinking about, you can start a sentence with nadhani
John:
“I think that…”
Medina:
Also maoni yangu
John:
“In my opinion…”
Medina:
Maybe even Kwangu mimi
John:
“As for me…” Can we hear a sentence using a sentence starter like these?
Medina:
Naona ni heri urudi nyumbani kwa wazazi uwasaidie.
John:
“The way I see it, is it’s better you go home and help your parents.” You can also ask other people for their opinions.
Medina:
Right. You can say something like wadhaniaje.
John:
“What do you think?”
Medina:
Or Maono yako ni ipi
John:
“What’s your opinion?” Finally for this lesson, let’s look at a few words to describe someone’s personality. Medina, can you give us a couple of words?
Medina:
Sure. maarufu
John:
“Popular.”
Medina:
mwerevu
John:
“Clever.”
Medina:
mpole
John:
“Polite.” Let’s wrap up this lesson, with a couple of sentences using these words.
Medina:
For example you can say Seneta maarufu alichaguliwa bila kupingwa.
John:
“The popular senator was elected unopposed. ”
Medina:
Yeye ni mpole hawezi umiza nzi.
John:
“She is too polite to injure a fly.”

Outro

John:
Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Medina:
Tuonane!

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