Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John:
Hi everyone, and welcome back to SwahiliPod101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 14 - Waiting in Line at a Kenyan Grocery Store. John Here.
Medina:
Hamjambo, I'm Medina.
John:
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make simple complaints. The conversation takes place at a supermarket.
Medina:
It's between Maria and Musa.
John:
The speakers are strangers in a customer service context. Therefore, they will speak formal Swahili. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Maria:
Hawa makarani wa pesa wa hii duka la kijumla wanafanya pole pole sana.
Musa:
Ndio. Hii foleni imekuwa ndefu sana.
Maria:
Tumechoka kusimama na joto imeongezeka hewani.
Musa:
Mimi kwanza nimechoka sana.
Maria:
Nikidhani mashine zao zimeharibika.
Musa:
Wacha basi nirudishe bidhaa zangu.
Maria:
Haiya...ni kama zimeanza kufanya kazi.
Musa:
Wafanye haraka basi ndio tuokoe masaa.
John:
Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Maria:
Hawa makarani wa pesa wa hii duka la kijumla wanafanya pole pole sana.
Musa:
Ndio. Hii foleni imekuwa ndefu sana.
Maria:
Tumechoka kusimama na joto imeongezeka hewani.
Musa:
Mimi kwanza nimechoka sana.
Maria:
Nikidhani mashine zao zimeharibika.
Musa:
Wacha basi nirudishe bidhaa zangu.
Maria:
Haiya...ni kama zimeanza kufanya kazi.
Musa:
Wafanye haraka basi ndio tuokoe masaa.
John:
Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Maria:
The cashiers in this supermarket are very slow.
Musa:
Yes. This line has become so long.
Maria:
I’m tired of standing, and the air has become so hot.
Musa:
I’m so tired.
Maria:
I think their cash register machines are broken.
Musa:
Let me return the goods.
Maria:
Ohhh...it seems they’ve started working.
Musa:
They should hurry up to save time.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John:
Are people in Kenya usually in a hurry, as Musa was in the dialogue?
Medina:
Kenyans are usually impatient people. They’re often accused by their neighbours of being fast or always in a hurry.
John:
I see. Maybe that’s more common in the major cities, right?
Medina:
Right, but in general Kenyans hurry to work. They often complain about traffic jams and people doing things at the last minute.
John:
I’m often late. What’s the Swahili for “I am getting late?”
Medina:
That’s nachelewa
John:
I’d better remember it! Now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John:
Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Medina:
duka [natural native speed]
John:
convenience store
Medina:
duka[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
duka [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Medina:
pole pole [natural native speed]
John:
slower
Medina:
pole pole[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
pole pole [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Medina:
tumechoka [natural native speed]
John:
to be tired
Medina:
tumechoka[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
tumechoka [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Medina:
zimeharibika [natural native speed]
John:
to spoil
Medina:
zimeharibika[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
zimeharibika [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Medina:
mashine [natural native speed]
John:
machines
Medina:
mashine[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
mashine [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Medina:
bidhaa [natural native speed]
John:
ingredients, shopping
Medina:
bidhaa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
bidhaa [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Medina:
kazi [natural native speed]
John:
job, work, career
Medina:
kazi[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
kazi [natural native speed]
John:
And last...
Medina:
masaa [natural native speed]
John:
time
Medina:
masaa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Medina:
masaa [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John:
Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Medina:
duka la kijumla
John:
meaning "supermarket."
Medina:
Duka la kijumla is a phrase made of three words.
John:
Let’s break it down.
Medina:
Duka
John:
is a noun meaning "shop,"
Medina:
la
John:
means "of," and
Medina:
kijumla means "in general."
John:
When put together, they mean "supermarket."
Medina:
The phrase duka la kijumla is also used to refer to a general shop.
John:
Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Medina:
Sure. For example, you can say, Napenda kwenda kwa duka la kijumla kwa vile mtu hujichukulia bidhaa mwenyewe.
John:
...which means "I love going to the supermarket because it is self-service."
John:
Okay, what's the next phrase?
Medina:
kufanya kazi
John:
meaning "working."
Medina:
Kufanya kazi is made of the verb kufanya, meaning "to do," and the noun kazi, meaning "work." The prefix ku is used to mean "of."
John:
This refers to a state of working. Can you give us an example using this word?
Medina:
Sure. For example, you can say, Kufanya kazi kunasaidia watu kujikimu maishani.
John:
...which means "Working helps people to earn their livelihoods."
John:
Okay, what's the next phrase?
Medina:
kuokoa masaa
John:
meaning "to save time." Let’s break this down.
Medina:
This is a phrase made of two words. First, Kuokoa.
John:
This is a verb meaning "to save," and next…
Medina:
masaa
John:
A noun which translates as "time." Altogether, this phrase is used to talk about saving time.
Medina:
When talking about time, some people may choose to say wacha kupoteza wakati, meaning "stop wasting time."
John:
Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Medina:
Sure. For example, you can say, Nikienda kwa ndege nitalipa ghali lakini nitaokoa masaa.
John:
...which means "If I use an airplane, I will pay expensively but I will save time."
John:
Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John:
In this lesson, you'll learn how to make simple complaints. In the dialogue, we heard two people complaining about the waiting while at the cash register.
Medina:
Yes, one of them said Hawa makarani wa pesa wa hii duka la kijumla wanafanya pole pole sana.
John:
which means “The cashiers in this supermarket are very slow.” Are there specific words we’d better remember when complaining?
Medina:
When complaining about delays in Swahili, you may use words such as ninalalamika,
John:
meaning “I am complaining,”
Medina:
ukawiaji,
John:
meaning “delay,”
Medina:
chelewa
John:
“to be late,”
Medina:
kupoteza wakati and pole pole
John:
Respectively meaning “to waste time” and “slowly.” All these words express delays and appear in sentences that discuss complaints about time.
Medina:
You show how you are annoyed by using words such as umekosa
John:
meaning “you have wronged me,”
Medina:
nimekasirika
John:
meaning “I am mad,” and…
Medina:
chelewa, meaning “to be late.”
John:
Let’s give some examples.
Medina:
Nalalamika kwa sababu tumekaa sana hapa na gari haliondoki.
John:
“I’m complaining because we have been delayed. We have been here for a while and the vehicle is not leaving.”
Medina:
Jaribu kuokoa masaa, unakaa sana.
John:
“Try to save time, you’re taking a lot of time.”
Medina:
Nimekasirika kwa vile mtu wa teksi amechelewa kunichukua.
John:
“I am annoyed because the taxi guy is late to pick me up.” Ok, now let’s learn some useful phrases for another topic which people like to complain about: the weather.
Medina:
When complaining about hali ya anga, meaning “the weather,” there are some useful words, such as hewa
John:
which means “air,”
Medina:
or mbaya and nzuri,
John:
meaning “bad” and “good”
Medina:
joto
John:
“hot”
Medina:
mvua
John:
“rainy.” These words are also useful when speaking about the weather in a neutral way.
Medina:
Here’s an example of a complaint: Leo kuna hali ya anga mbaya sana.
John:
“Today there is very bad weather.”
Medina:
Tumechoka kusimama na joto imeongezeka hewani.
John:
“I am tired of standing and the weather has become so hot.” Lastly let’s go over some keywords when complaining about things not working.
Medina:
Haribika is the verb literally meaning “to spoil.”
John:
So it’s commonly used to complain about things not working.
Medina:
You may also use -vunjika or katika to mean “to break” and chomeka “burnt” to talk about destruction and complain about things not working. You can also say Haifanyi
John:
which means “It is not working.”
Medina:
In most cases, hai- is the prefix that comes before -fanyi when constructing written or spoken sentences about things not working. For example: Mashine yake ya kunyoa haifanyi kazi
John:
which means “His electric razor is not working.”
Medina:
Hai can be combined with other verbs to express dysfunction. For example, Gari haiendi,
John:
meaning “The car is not moving,”
Medina:
Hii foleni ya hospitali haisongi,
John:
“This hospital queue is not moving.”
Medina:
Please note that -fanyi is also prefixed by other words such as sifanyi
John:
meaning “I do not do.”

Outro

John:
Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Medina:
Tuonane!

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